Common Questions

This depends on your immediate situation. If your loved one is in a nursing home or other care facility they will ask which funeral you would like to use and make the initial call for you. If the death occurs at your loved one’s, or another’s home and is under the immediate care of a hospice organization or home nursing care, you must first notify them and then you or the nurse may call the funeral home. The funeral home staff in both of these cases will reach out to the family to set and arrangement time. If the death occurs at a residence with no nursing or hospice involvement you must call the police and report the death and they will contact the local coroner’s office. Family is then responsible for contacting the funeral home.

When this happens a death is under investigation, this could be for a number of reasons. The coroner can do an autopsy to further their investigation, but the family may request an autopsy not be performed. This also means the local coroner will be signing the death certificate and this can take up to 12 weeks until a cause of death is ruled and added to the report.

We recommend calling the local funeral home where services will be held. We will make the arrangements for bringing your loved back home in a timely and dignified manner.

We recommend calling the funeral home first, most cemeteries and churches will not set up services without confirming with the funeral home. We will make these calls, fill in the appropriate information, and set up times for you.

Embalming is not required by law in the state of Ohio. We only require embalming when there will be a public viewing of the deceased. This is for the health and safety of the general public. Any persons wishing to privately view un-embalmed remains must sign a hold harmless release form.

You will need personal information about your loved one, including their Social Security Number, date of birth, parents names, addresses and more. If you wish you may print these forms out HERE and start them at home. We also recommend bringing in a good picture of your loved one, their clothing you wish for them to be buried or cremated in and a method of payment.

As long as your loved was discharged from their service honorably they at minimum are entitled to a grave marker at a cemetery, a flag and an honor guard ceremony that includes folding and presentation of the flag and the playing to ‘Taps’. To get these honors a certificate of honorable discharge is required by the military, this DD-214 must be sent for honors to be performed.

Unfortunately if the death has occurred it is unlikely that honors can be performed without this documentation. If you are preplanning and unable to find the paperwork we can help you submit a form to the National Archives requesting the documentation. This process can take 4 to 8 weeks.

We are a small family run business and as always cash or check is preferred. We do accept all major credit cards but we add a 3% convenience fee to all credit card purchases. You may also assign a life insurance policy to the funeral home in advance to cover the costs of the funeral. If your loved one has a life insurance policy where a family member is the beneficiary we use an assignment service in these cases, a fee is charged by the servicer. Their information can be found here (https://www.directorschoiceservices.com/page/home.dalp).

According to the National Funeral Directors Association as of 2012 the average cost of a traditional funeral with a casket and a vault is approximately $8,350. Of course this price is an average and we can provide services to fit most budgets. Please see our services page for some costs on some of our offerings.

We are happy to provide any services required by your family for your loved one. We have our own licensed crematory and personnel on our premises, unlike most other funeral service providers who use a third party. This means your loved one never leaves our care.

Yes and No. A funeral home must do the same paperwork and acquire the same permits and authorizations as burial, but at a faster pace. In the state of Ohio, a death certificate must be signed by a doctor or the local coroner before any cremation can occur, which can take time which means a person’s remains must be kept in refrigeration until all authorizations are signed. As with anything we can accommodate a variety of services, even with cremation and person can still have a viewing in a casket, a church service then the cremation takes place afterwards. Cemetery costs can be reduced depending on where the remains will be placed.